Contact Us:

Morrill Hall of Agriculture
446 W. Circle Dr. Room 310
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 432-1555

Manure and Nutrient Management

farm equipment 

Cereal Rye: Manure and Livestock’s New Best Friend
By Natalie Rector, Tim Harrigan, Dale Mutch, Sieglinde Snapp

Conserving Nutrients During Manure Storage
By Wendy Powers

Basics of Anaerobic Digestion
By Dana Kirk and Steve Safferman

The Real Value of Livestock Production
By Natalie Rector
From the November 2008 Scoop.

Conserve Manure with Nutrient Management
By Wendy Powers
From the November 2008 Scoop.

Conserving N in manure saves money
As fertilizer prices increase, so does the farmers’ interest in using manure as a primary source of nitrogen. Read the entire article from the Michigan Farmer.

It pays to know the value of animal manure
Increasing commercial fertilizer prices has generated an interest in manure as an alternitive source of crop nutrients. Read entire article from the Michigan Farmer.

Tracking raindrops on farm, field
By Marilyn Thelen and Natalie Rector
When it rains, it pours. But what does that rain hit and where does it go? Those are the important questions related to manure management on small- and medium-sized farms. Read entire article from the Michigan Farmer.

Smaller farms aim of manure talks
By Jerry May
Last spring, more than 200 livestock producers from across the state participated in Manure and the Environment on Small and Medium Farms, an MSU Extension-sponsored workshop that took place in 19 locations throughout the state. Those in attendance told us that they left with an increased understanding of their environmental responsibilities. And, as always, we learned a lot from them, too. Read entire article from the Michigan Farmer.

Get ready for spring manure application
By Natalie Rector

What can you do to improve manure management on your farm? it all depends on where you’re currently at and how far you want to go. Read entire article from Michigan Farmer.

Manage manure relative to your farm
By Natalie Rector
You need a plan. You need a systems approach. One size doesn’t fit all. When it comes to manure management, we’re all heard them all, and they are all right. Read entire article from Michigan Farmer.

Challenges and opportunities exist in applying manure in the summer
By Natalie Rector
Manure applications follow on the heels of wheat and corn silage harvest. The dry soil conditions of late summer can be some of the best for hauling manure from the standpoint of reducing soil compaction. Read entire article from Michigan Farmer.

Place manure in the root zone
By Natalie Rector
When manure is placed and retained in the root zone, the nutrients are recycled for crop production. This requires management strategies that reduce the risk of runoff, nitrogen volatilization, leaching and movement of tile drains. Read entire article from Michigan Farmer.

Manure on fields offers loads of benefits
By Natalie Rector
Manure is being hauled onto fields at a rapid pace this spring. It’s both a necessary and expensive task, but there is a silver lining. The nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and micronutrients all come along for the ride. Read entire article from Michigan Farmer.

Are CNMPS Worth the Hassle?
By Ben Darling
When we entered into the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) permit process for the MSU south campus farms, we went through the same emotions and struggles as everyone else when contemplating the task at hand. Read entire article

Producers Adjust Manure Spreading Rates
Producers are finding new ways to capture nutrients while reducing manure rates and the potential for manure to contaminate surface waters. Land application of manure is the oldest and most sustainable method of livestock and crop farming. Read entire article

Capturing Land-Applied Manure in the Root Zone
Part 1: Sediment and Contaminant Runoff
Management practices that capture land-applied manure in the root zone will make the nutrients available for the next crop, improve soil quality, and prevent manure nutrient and contaminant loss in runoff. Read entire article

Adjusting Spreading Rates
By Natalie Rector and Dr. Tim Harrigan
Two area producers are finding new ways to capture nutrients while reducing manure rates and the potential for manure to contaminate surface water.  Crop rotations, soil types, weather and manure systems provide unique challenges and opportunities for each producer.  Read entire article

Reducing Manure Application Rates: It Can Be Done
By Jerry May and Natalie Rector
Learn how the Swartzendruber’s retrofitted their manure tank to reduce rates.

Improving Manure Management: A Springtime Checklist
Livestock producers are asking, “What should I be doing to improve manure management on my farm?” The answer is it all depends on where you’re currently at and how far you want to go. Read entire article

Fall Field Goals
There’s more to fall than football and harvest. If you are planning to buy one dime of fertilizer or spread one tank of manure, be sure soil and manure tests are taken to direct your nutrient management plans. Read entire article

Myths About Manure—What’s your manure IQ?
“With rising nitrogen prices, manure nutrients are more valuable than ever”, says Natalie Rector, MSU Extension Nutrient Management Agent.  Manure contains nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and many micronutrients, but…  Read entire article

Nutrient Status of Your Fields?
Soil sampling is the best tool that you have to assess the nutrient status of your fields. There are several steps involved in taking a good soil sample. First, a field should be sampled once every 3 years. Read entire article

Have Enough Land to Apply Your Manure?
In order to answer this question, you must collect a few pieces of information. You will need: current soil test levels for your fields, amount of phosphorus (P) excreted by your livestock, crop rotation, P removal, distance to surface waters, and capacity of manure storage. Read entire article

Re-evaluating Manure Application to Alfalfa
Dairy producers have utilized manure (slurry) as an important nitrogen source mainly for corn, grasses, and small grains. Considerable research has been conducted on fertilization of alfalfa and grasses with inorganic fertilizer. Read entire article

To view the Manure Management and Utilization Generally Accepted Agricultural and Management Practices (GAAMPs), click here.

To view the Nutrient Management Generally Accepted Agricultural and Management Practices (GAAMPs), click here.

Optimizing Use of Nutrients for Crops:  Replacing Commercial Fertilizer with Dairy Manure.

As commercial (synthetic) fertilizer prices continue to increase, use of livestock manure as a nutrient resource for crop production is becoming increasingly more important.  Read entire article